by Amy Chaplin
Martha's Circle

breakfast!

I wanted to share one of the recipes I created for Whole Living’s July/August issue. For those of you who are not on my newsletter list, I developed 8 summer recipes focusing on cooling foods from an Ayurvedic perspective. You can now see all the recipes at wholeliving.com.  There’s a little info on Ayurveda at the bottom of this post.

I spied the first nectarines of the season at my little local farmer’s market last weekend and couldn’t resist making this breakfast again. The delicious tanginess of the nectarines works so well with the creamy coconut oats. I know many of you sweltering in the heat of New York City and elsewhere cannot imagine a warm breakfast. But from both an Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine point of view, it is better to avoid cold foods, even in the heat. I find letting the pudding cool down to warm or room temperature a great way to serve it during these hot months. It will thicken up a bit; so I recommend drizzling with additional almond milk.

breakfast for two

Coconut breakfast pudding with sautéed nectarines
Recipe developed for Whole Living.

Try making this pudding with peaches if you don’t have ripe nectarines. You can also just top it with juicy fresh fruit or berries.

2/3 cup old-fashioned rolled oats

1/3 cup unsweetened shredded coconut

1 cup almond milk, plus more for serving

1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Pinch of sea salt

2 teaspoons coconut oil

2 nectarines, sliced

1 tablespoon maple syrup, plus more for drizzling

1/4 cup unsweetened large coconut flakes, toasted

 

In a bowl, combine oats and shredded coconut with 1 1/2 cups water and refrigerate overnight.

Transfer mixture to a saucepan and add almond milk, cinnamon, and salt. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer, covered, until creamy, about 12 minutes. Remove from heat, stir, cover pot and set aside while you prepare the nectarines.

nectarines ready

Heat oil in a medium skillet over medium-high heat and sauté nectarines until golden, 1 to 2 minutes and then stir in maple syrup.

Divide oats between two bowls and top with sautéed nectarines and coconut flakes. Drizzle with additional almond milk if desired.

Prinable recipe here

 

The term Ayurveda comes from the Sanskrit words ayus, meaning life or lifespan, and veda, meaning knowledge. It is a traditional Hindu system of medicine practiced in India for over 5,000 years. It works to re-establish balance in the body through diet, lifestyle, exercise, and cleansing. According to Ayuvedic medicine, there are three doshas (energy types)- Pitta, Vata and Kapha. Everyone has one or two doshas that are dominant.

Author of Ayurveda A Life of Balance, Maya Tiwari writes, “The doshas are not simply the dynamic energy within the body; rather, they are influenced primarily by seasonal variations.”  As summer heats up, we become prone to accumulating excess pitta, which can result in inflammation, acidity and irritability.

 

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7 Responses to “Coconut breakfast pudding with sautéed nectarines”

  1. Natali Gill says:

    Beautiful. I just attempted to jump into the screen. Also, thanks for the tip on Medjool dates (in an older post.) I have had to follow a sweetener-free diet for a while and I indulge in one or two per day to keep my sanity. Better than caramel!

  2. Natali Gill says:

    I’m about to delve into some of your pudding recipes (this one and the chia pudding.) I like that they are dairy/gluten free and I can easily make them without sugar. Sometimes you mention Ayurveda which I am interested in but don’t know too much about. Would this be a good night snacK? I’m always hungry a few hours after dinner and I never know what to eat. This seems satiating but not heavy.

  3. It looks really delicious. I love the flavour of coconut and the tanginess of the fruits. :)

  4. Raquel says:

    Hi Amy! thank you for this recipe, I made it today and it was delicious!!
    I can´t wait to try your other recipes :)

  5. Carol says:

    This looks amazing. I will surely be making this for breakfast this week. Should I drain off the excess water from the oat/coconut mixture before cooking with the almond milk? Thanks!

  6. pam says:

    after having steel cut oats made with soy in the frig, already prepared, all winter, (and untouched by the hubby) the very same hubby just announced he should eat oatmeal. your email and recipe came at the perfect time. i made these oats and they are just wonderful. the nectarines i purchased weren’t quite ripe but fresh, chopped strawberries a second best. thank you as always. peace.

  7. Bonnie says:

    Oh delish!
    What a great way to start the day!

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